Satisfy Your Need for Colors

Tone a Canvas photo
How to Tone a Canvas
October 31, 2017
How to be a Full-Time Artist
Becoming a Full-Time Artist
October 31, 2017
Show all

Satisfy Your Need for Colors

Need for Colors

Satisfy Your Need for Colors

Artists have voracious appetites for texture– for new methods of seeing marks appear on a surface and teasing out forms with various strokes. In Creative Discoveries, I’ve found a banquet for our senses. Texture pours off the page. Painters and illustrators use watercolor, pen, pastel, ink, and more. They hook us into their orbit and keep our eyes locked to their works.

Here are three (of many!) of my brand-new preferred methods of integrating surface area tension into art, whether it is with repetition, eye enticing backgrounds or strokes that reveal you exactly what they are made from. Art-school has them all!

Color & Repeat

Two things are precisely what the artist Ted Michalowski brings to the table. The first technique operates in the world color. Take a look at all those pinks and purples and pink-ish washes. The artist layers pink on pink with more extreme flowers highlighting details in the figures’ clothes and hair. He likewise uses broad strokes of purple and pink to provide measurement.

The 2nd strategy generates repeating of forms. When in doubt, create. The three performances of the same figure create a story-line element that would not be there otherwise. It also includes a lot of creamy surface texture that makes the artwork feel fanciful and appealing. Win-win.

Freedom of Space and Colours

Pentimenti are the Italian term for all the little false things you make on your surface area. At that time those lines were often concealed, but many artists nowadays welcome the marks that ultimately lead them to “true.”.

Agnes Grochulska’s charcoal sketch is an ideal example. The visual interest of all those lines brings something brand-new to the table and permits the artist the freedom to search and discover as she sharpens her type.

Lead the Way

“I want you to show me the way.” Do you know that Pete Frampton song? Well, Steven Hill does. He’s certainly showed us the method his pastel work– you can see how he took his pastel and pulled it down, down, down then across his cover.

The shapes he leaves behind get to be both abstract swaths of color along with reasonable spots of lathering water, greenery, and mossy stones.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *